Archive for December, 2013

Santa Penguin? Not in my house!

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

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Should I be making plans to take my grandchildren to see Santa Penguin, right after we decorate the Holiday tree?

NO!

I try not to let the secularization of Christmas get me down, because it is a beautiful and sacred season that I look forward to every year. But this year, the rhetoric around Christmas has gotten downright disheartening.

For one thing, the American Atheists are back in Times Square with a billboard that suggests we take Christ out of Christmas, because the really important things about Christmas are the Rockettes, presents and Chinese food (included, I suppose, because Chinese restaurants are open on Christmas, offering sustenance to the fictional family of “A Christmas Story” and to real-life Jewish families).

But it’s the penguin that’s really got my goat. Slate magazine blogger Aisha Harris suggested in a post that we ditch the pink-cheeked Santa in favor of a penguin, because kids of every color like penguins and no one will feel excluded. She recalls her childhood, when she would see white Santas in the mall and black Santas in her neighborhood. When she asked her father why. “My father replied that Santa was every color. Whatever house he visited, jolly old St. Nicholas magically turned into the likeness of the family that lived there.”

What a wise and wonderful father, offering up what I thought was a perfect answer. But Ms. Harris didn’t buy it. She goes on to say how she felt so ashamed of her dark skin because she thought the real Santa must be white. I hope that’s not true, because I hate to think of any child being ashamed of who she is. But I’m also tired of the annual attempts to make me feel guilty for being a Christian.

I believe in the divinity of Jesus Christ. I celebrate His birth at Christmas, mourn His death on Good Friday and revel in His resurrection on Easter Sunday. I was born and raised a Catholic and the church welcomed me back with open arms even after I had left it for years. One of the most beloved Christmas traditions is to tell children about Santa Claus, a jolly old man who lives in the North Pole and delivers gifts to good children all over the world. To young Christmas celebraters, it’s enchanting to think about Santa visiting every home all over the world. Santa is completely inclusive in these young minds. You just have to be good!

The legendary Santa Claus sprang from the real-life St. Nicholas, a wealthy and generous young man from what is now Turkey. He became a priest, and then a bishop. I don’t know if he had rosy red cheeks, but I do know he was not a penguin. He was an actual flesh-and-blood human being. His first act of beneficence saved young girls who were on the verge of being sold into slavery. His story spread throughout Europe, and Europeans brought him, and their traditions of giving each other small gifts, with them to the New World. The legend spread and morphed and St. Nicholas became Santa Claus, known for his trademark red suit and his bowl-full-of-jelly tummy.

I am not denying that our country has been, and in many ways still remains, divided by race. But Santa Claus is not the culprit. The fact that black Santas existed in Ms. Harris’s childhood was a sign that African-Americans had embraced this delightful custom as part of their (very Christian) celebration of Christmas, but ornament makers and greeting card designers hadn’t yet caught up.

I don’t know if Ms. Harris will take any solace from this, but every child worries that the Santa on whose lap they are perched is not the real one. The hope that he might be is part of the magic of Christmas.

Somehow, I just don’t see a penguin pulling that off.

Posted in Catholic Church, Christmas, Faith, Family, Holidays / Feast Days |
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Post-abortive dad turns to an advice columnist for help

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

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The truth about the way abortion affects men comes to the surface in places you might not expect.

The rapper Flypside with his haunting video “Happy Birthday,” tells the truth about abortion loss from the perspective of a man wondering what his 4-year-old would be like.

Steven Tyler’s lament, “Jesus, what have I done,” after he forced his teenage girlfriend to abort their child shows that he realized, even if too late, that he had sanctioned the murder of his own son, and it hurt.

Now even advice columnists are hearing from men who regret their roles in an abortion, even if they don’t find out about it until years later.

An advice column in The Sentinel, in Stokes, England, yesterday ran a letter from a man who found out, years after the fact, that a woman with whom he had a casual, but physical, relationship ended up leaving school suddenly because she became pregnant, and had an abortion. His letter is filled with raw, honest, emotion. It tells the truth about how so many people feel after choosing abortion.
He wrote:

“Throughout university I was in a relationship with a girl who loved me more than I did her and I cheated on her and often stood her up. Just before our finals she left suddenly and seemed to disappear. Fifteen years on she contacted me through Facebook and suggested we meet. She eventually told me why she left, that she was pregnant with our child, knew I wouldn’t support her, had an abortion and became very depressed and attempted suicide before getting her life back on track. She finished her degree, has a good job and is married and has one child and she says she is very happy. I was shocked that she had gone through all of that, on her own and largely because of me. I feel so guilty that I treated her so unkindly. Since she told me I have been off sick from work and my friends are worried about me, but I’m too ashamed to tell them what is going on.”

The honesty in this letter almost hurts. He didn’t love her. He cheated on her. And yet he continued to have sex with her, knowing her feelings were stronger and deeper.

The advice columnist first focuses on the fact that the woman might be at fault for having told him after so much time had elapsed, but eventually addresses the real issue, that his feelings are pent up with remorse and regret over his lost child.

The columnist’s reply:

“I would suggest you see your GP if you haven’t already, just to get some support. I feel torn in your case. This, on the one hand, smacks of your ex feeling the need to dump this on you. However, we often do not reflect on how we treat others and hearing what she had to say has led you to look at your past behaviour. That’s no bad thing, providing we learn from our mistakes. I am glad to hear that you have changed and you find that young man unrecognisable. I hope you can forgive yourself now and move on from this, as you cannot change what is done. Counselling would help you to come to terms with this and deal with the loss of your child.”

In their stepped-up effort to eliminate the “stigma” of abortion, pro-aborts are urging women to tell their abortion stories, and, like the women and men of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign who have been sharing the pain of their abortions for more than 10 years, the stories, more often than not, include feelings of regret and loss. Pro-aborts listen to these stories and say, “abortion has to remain legal anyway, no matter how much pain it causes.” We hear the stories and we know that we have to work harder to ensure the day will come when no one will make that choice, because the pain is often too much to bear.

Please join me in calling for an end to abortion by pulling this harmful product, this violence masquerading as choice, off the market. Go to www.recallabortion.com and sign the petition.

If you are a man hurting from an abortion loss, please go to Silent No More and click on the photo “Men and Abortion.”

Posted in Men and abortion, Stigma | 1 Comment »
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New study from China recognizes the abortion-breast cancer link

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

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I’m guessing you won’t read this in the mainstream media, but today the pro-life media is abuzz with the results of a new study out of China that shows a 44 percent increased risk of breast cancer for women who have had one abortion. The risk increases to 76 percent for women who have had two abortions, and jumps to 89 percent for those who have had three.

The study was actually a meta-analysis, which means researchers combed existing studies specifically to look for the abortion-breast cancer (ABC) link. They found it. The researchers concluded:

“IA (induced abortion) is significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer among Chinese females, and the risk of breast cancer increases as the number of IA increases.”

Writing in the American Thinker, Dr. Mary Davenport, a member of the board of the Breast Cancer Prevention Institute, notes that “There is no bigger data base than China, where there are an average of 8.2 million pregnancy terminations every year, and 40 abortions for every 100 live births. Chinese researchers and physicians are unencumbered by abortion politics, and do not cover up data showing long term effects of induced abortion, as do their U.S. counterparts in governmental, professional and consumer organizations.”

The Chinese aren’t the only ones to have noticed the ABC link. There have been 70 peer-reviewed studies performed all over the world that demonstrate the ABC link, according to Dr. Angela Lanfranchi, a breast cancer surgeon in practice since 1984. She notes that many of the studies were performed in countries, like China, where abortion is part of public policy and information on it is readily available.

In the U.S., we call abortion vital health-care for women, but questioning its safety is not allowed. That’s why, when the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study this past spring that showed an increase in the most aggressive cancers among young women from 1976 to 2009, mainstream media reporters fell over themselves to come up with a cause that had nothing to do with the legalization both of hormonal contraception (1972) and abortion (1973).

That’s also why, when researchers in a study commissioned by GE Healthcare reported in October that breast cancer rates are surging in China and the U.S., they blamed it on “women having fewer children as well as hormonal interventions like post-menopausal hormonal therapy,” without mentioning that hormonal contraception and abortion loom large in the reasons why women are having fewer children.

My whole reason for writing my book, “Recall Abortion,” was to point out the many ways abortion is unsafe for women. Breast cancer is one of the major causes of death for women in this country, and if abortion is causing more, and more deadly, breast cancers, isn’t that something we should all be talking about?

To sign the petition to demand a government recall of abortion, go to www.RecallAbortion.com. You can also order the book there, or at www.Amazon.com, where the book is also available for Kindle.

Posted in Abortion Complications, Breast Cancer, Contraception, Forced Abortion, Health Care, One Child Policy, Uncategorized | 1 Comment »
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