Archive for November, 2014

Brave Mom Rejects Pressure to Abort Her Disabled Child, Finds Guardian Angels at “The Promise”

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

Pregnant-woman[1]

by Janet Morana and Kevin Burke, LSW

Blessed are the poor in spirit … for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Here’s a real life situation that is tailor made for pro abortion apologists:

- Arielle is a single mother of two young children and facing an unplanned   pregnancy. In the early stages of her prenatal care the doctor told her “your baby has a serious medical condition and won’t survive.”  Arielle’s baby girl had a chromosomal defect known as Trisomy 18, along with severe cardiac defects. The chances of her child surviving a full term pregnancy, let alone being born alive were slim. And if the baby was born alive, she would likely die before her first birthday.

In the majority of cases like this the unborn baby will be aborted. The mother (and father if involved) will face the complicated grief and trauma that are common after such procedures.

Medical Pressures to Abort

Arielle was a patient at a Pittsburgh-based hospital pregnancy clinic. Many of the medical professionals advised her to abort.  When Arielle informed them that she was going to carry the child to term, she found that the clinic did not want to spend money on a life that was not expected to survive long after birth. Arielle was feeling more isolated and alone. Her hope was that clinic personnel would be more sensitive and attentive to her struggle as an expectant mother of a child with medical challenges.

Despite great pressure Arielle resisted. She drew upon a deepening of her faith and trust in God. She revealed a spiritual wisdom that far exceeded that of the highly educated medical professionals who were presenting abortion as the only reasonable solution to her problem pregnancy.

Arielle reflects on their temptations to abort:

“Do you know how the devil makes bad things look good?” 
Arielle discerned that if her daughter were to die, then the death of her baby should be natural, not based on her decision…but on God’s timing. Arielle made the brave choice to carry her baby girl to term. When she shared the news of her baby’s poor prognosis with her 9 year-old daughter and 8 year-old son, their response, like their mother’s revealed an advanced level of trust in God’s providence:

“We will love her as long as she’s with us,” the children told their mother.

Even with her strong faith and supportive children, Arielle was still alone with a very challenging diagnosis, and an uncertain future.

Thankfully the faithfulness of Arielle and her family was rewarded when a representative from Northside Christian Community Health Center told her about The Promise.

The Promise is a Pittsburgh based prolife program of Catholic Palliative Services committed to walking alongside families with a poor prognosis for their unborn and newly born infants. They help women like Ariel to face their journey with hope and optimism.

Arielle came to The Promise overwhelmed and not aware of her options and the best way to proceed. The Promise team of Lori Heil and doula, Brandy Rawls offered the support and guidance to help Arielle discern the best options for her care:

“Brandy knew questions that I didn’t even think of,” Arielle stated.

Advocates for Life

One of the most important resources The Promise provides is advocacy for the mother and child. Parents face an uphill battle in a medical climate that can be hostile to those that choose life-affirming alternatives when facing a fetal disability. Arielle was being denied appointments with neonatologists and other specialists. She needed a knowledgeable advocate for herself and her unborn baby. Here’s where a resource like The Promise is so important.

Promise representatives attended Arielle’s clinic appointments and secured the care typical for a pregnant woman. “Lori and Brandy helped to put things into perspective that were too touchy for others to handle,” Arielle shared.

When she chose not to terminate her pregnancy, clinic personnel were encouraging Arielle to place the baby in a hospital setting after her birth. Knowing that she had a team of people focusing on a live birth and possible discharge to home alleviated many of the unknowns for Arielle. Through The Promise, Arielle’s baby would have the opportunity to be at home with family, with medical care provided by Catholic Hospice.

A Brief Life…an Eternal Destiny

Alonna Angel quietly entered this world on Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 3:27 PM weighing four pounds, two ounces and measuring 17 ½ inches long. Approximately twenty minutes later, she took her final breath on this earth while lovingly cradled in the arms of her mother.

Everything happens for a reason. How often we have heard that phrase as a condolence statement in reaction to a difficult time in our lives. Although it’s meant to be supportive, most often it can also evoke great sadness and heartache. But for those who maintain a strong and faithful relationship with God…like Arielle and her family…everything happens for His reason.

Although the emotional healing will take time, a memorial service is being planned to recognize Alonna Angel’s short life on this earth and the great love that her mother and siblings hold for her. Arielle’s hope is that her experience with this pregnancy will get her to a place where she can help others going through the similar situations. The Promise will follow Arielle and her two surviving children for 13 months in a specialized bereavement program.

Every life is a miracle, whether long or short, it is worthy and matters. Arielle demonstrated incredible faith and strength to give her daughter the gift of life.

Support services provided through The Promise are made possible by community contributions and foundation grant support. If you would like more information on the program or to contribute, call 1.866.933.6221.

Posted in Abortion, Faith, Family, Health Care, Perinatal hospice, Women's Health | 6 Comments »
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Jane Fonda: Abortion apologist and abortion survivor

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

85th Annual Academy Awards - Arrivals

I’m just catching up to the news that Jane Fonda and her brother, Peter Fonda, are abortion survivors. Their mother, who was sexually abused by a piano tuner as a child and physically abused by her two husbands, George Brokaw and Henry Fonda, had nine abortions before Jane was born and finally took her own life.

In one of her books and at an event last month, Ms. Fonda said that when she learned of the sexual abuse that began when her mother was just a child, she was able to forgive her for the suicide that left her without a mother at the age of 12.

Ms. Fonda is less forthcoming on what she thinks about the nine abortions, except to say they played a role in Francis Fonda’s ultimate act of desperation.
Perhaps her near-silence on her mother’s abortions can be explained by Jane Fonda’s vocal support of abortion over the last several decades. If she’s advocating free and open access to the very thing that contributed to her mother’s suicide, that’s a clear indication she’s in denial.

Pro-aborts love to say there is no link from abortion to suicide, and though they raked researcher Priscilla Coleman over the coals when she uncovered a substantial link, the fact cannot be hidden forever.

In a 2010 study, researchers from the National Center for Biotechnology Information – which works hand in hand with the National Institutes of Health – found that abortion was associated with an increased likelihood of several mental disorders, including anxiety, substance abuse, suicidal ideation and attempted suicide.

But beyond the abortion-suicide link, Francis Fonda’s multiple abortions very likely fueled the problems Jane Fonda experienced and has often discussed: Low self-esteem, poor body image, eating disorders and other problems.

Dr. Philip Ney, a Canadian psychiatrist who is an expert on survivor syndrome following abortion, has written that surviving children – including those who know only intuitively that they have lost siblings to abortion –can develop a “wanted” mentality that makes them see themselves as objects and not people. They become possessions, and as such are expected to meet the expectations of those around them. These children are trying to be the perfect child in order to prove their worth to their parents.

Jane’s pro-abortion activism also might be a direct result of her mother’s nine abortions and subsequent suicide. Abortion researchers have long proposed that the high rate of repeat abortions is a result of post-traumatic re-enactment, an unconscious coping mechanism that prompts people to repeat an experience, even if it was terrible, as a way of justifying it, or normalizing it.

Maybe one way Jane tried to make sense of her mother’s tortured past was to try to normalize it by advocating abortion as a good thing, as a right to which every woman is entitled.

Jane Fonda’s recent musings, including a blog she maintains on her website, indicate that as she ages, she is growing more introspective. She has apologized for her controversial meeting with North Vietnamese soldiers during the Vietnam War and even advocates for abstinence in her book “Being a Teen.” Perhaps we can look forward to a day when she will change her pro-abortion views and honestly discuss what it felt like to learn that she was not one of two children, but one of 11.

When she’s ready to take that step, I hope she will seek healing and finally find the peace that has eluded her.

Posted in Abortion, Abortion Complications, abortion survivors, Family | 11 Comments »
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Glen Campbell and Brittany Maynard Face Their Mortality Very Differently

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

1413489817_brittany-maynard-video-article[1]This blog was originally published in the National Catholic Register on Oct. 28, just a few days before Brittany Maynard committed suicide in Oregon.

Two stories battled for my attention recently, and both of them broke my heart.

The first was about Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old woman with brain cancer who moved from California to Oregon to gain access to legal suicide-inducing drugs. She is planning to die in bed, surrounded by her family, on Nov. 1 (the solemnity of All Saints), two days after her husband’s birthday.

The second story was about the singer Glen Campbell, who decided to go public with his struggle against Alzheimer’s disease. With his children on stage with him for a final, 151-stop musical tour, and the cameras rolling for a ground-breaking documentary, Campbell said: “I ain’t done yet. Tell ’em that.”

Maynard is fighting, through a foundation set up in her name, to expand the right to die beyond the five states that now allow it.

Campbell is allowing himself to be seen in all his vulnerability to show those suffering with Alzheimer’s — some 44 million people worldwide — and all those who will be diagnosed in the future, that, as St. John Paul said, “Life is always a good.”

Our reactions to these stories show that, as usual, we Americans seem to have a split personality. We applaud Campbell for his courage in refusing to go quietly into that good night, and yet many of us also support Maynard’s desire to “die with dignity.”

I do not.

I have watched people close to me die, and, with the rest of the world, I watched St. John Paul suffer with the debilitating and ultimately fatal effects of Parkinson’s disease. It was heartbreaking, and while I prayed for a miracle for all of them, I also prayed that each would have a peaceful death.

But we are not the architects of our own lives, no matter what we think and no matter how many misguided politicians and activist judges we can convince that we are. What Maynard is doing is wrong, and my fervent prayer is that she changes her mind.

With palliative care, we can hope for a death without pain for ourselves and our loved ones, and there is nothing wrong with that. We can refuse extraordinary, unnatural treatments. But to choose suicide — and to further legalize it in this country — is a catastrophic mistake.

Take a look at what assisted suicide and euthanasia are doing to Belgium and Denmark.

In a piece for Front Page magazine last month, Stephen Brown wrote:

“Holland was the first European country to betray its Judeo-Christian heritage regarding the sanctity of life when it legalized euthanasia in 2001. Holland also has the dubious distinction of leading the way in killing babies, as the Dutch euthanasia policy was expanded in 2006 to babies born with severe birth defects.

It therefore should not surprise that Holland is another country where euthanasia appears out of control. In 2011, 3,695 people were reported medically killed, including 13 psychiatric patients, while 4,188 were euthanized in 2102, accounting for three percent of all Holland’s deaths that year.”

Brown wrote that, in 2012, Holland also began sending mobile death teams to the homes of people who want to die but whose doctors refuse to help them. And Belgium, if possible, is worse.

According to Brown:

“Originally, Belgium’s euthanasia law, passed in 2002, was meant for gravely ill adults suffering unbearable physical pain. Now, as mentioned, it includes those experiencing ‘unbearable psychological suffering.’ So relatively healthy people suffering mental stress or disorders are now being killed, among them a 44-year-old person who had undergone a failed sex change operation. So it is no wonder the number of euthanasia victims in Belgium has grown from 24 people in 2002 to 1,807 in 2013, an average of five per day and a 27 percent increase from 2012.”

Brown also reported that Belgium’s King Philippe signed a law last March allowing euthanasia for children of any age and dementia sufferers upon request. Last month, Belgium — a country without the death penalty — made headlines again when it granted a convicted murderer the right to die under the country’s euthanasia laws. Another 15 inmates have made the same request.

Could this happen in the United States? Could we have mobile death squads and legalized murder of babies born with birth defects? In a country that has aborted 55 million children in the last generation, and where “choice” is well on its way to becoming the new religion, it absolutely could. We are already headed that way.

Since Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act was passed 14 years ago, 1,100 people have asked for the lethal prescription, and two-thirds of them have ended their lives with it. Please pray with me that Maynard does not join that group and changes her mind about her date with death.

Life is always a good, even if it is cut tragically short by a disease we cannot control.

Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/blog/JMorana/glen-campbell-and-brittany-maynard-face-their-mortality-very-differently#ixzz3IKRDcfuL

Posted in assisted suicide, Cancer, Catholic Church, Christianity, Faith, Family, Health Care, Priests for Life | 1 Comment »
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